The impact of doctors prescribing powerful painkillers on the growth of substance abuse in our culture has been gaining visibility. The implication of most of the studies and articles isn’t that doctors are being lazy, irresponsible or ignorant, but more that their standard directives regarding what to prescribe, under what circumstances, and whether there may be other means to combat pain may need to be reconsidered.  As this  Forbes  article states: “Even well-meaning doctors can find themselves inadvertently leading a patient to addiction and overdose.”  By no means are most individuals stating that doctors are directly responsible for the rise in addiction and opioid use in our country. The fact is that there are a myriad of reasons individuals become reliant on or even open to the use of one substance or another. There is not one entry point to use, and therefore there is not one simple answer to the challenge of addiction.  When it comes to battling substance abuse, we need to follow every lead, look down every avenue, identify every entry point, and tackle each in its own way. This includes taking a serious look at how and when medical providers prescribe potentially addictive pain medications to see if more precautions can be established.  Our Foundation’s Volunteer Committee Member, Lisa Buchwald,generously shared her experience regarding an emergency appendectomy she had at Baptist Hospital not long ago. She shared that she feels fortunate, in a way, that she is allergic to prescription pain medications, because not being able to use them meant she also was unable to grow to abuse them. In Lisa's own words: “I was definitely a unique case and my surgeon told me that my recovery was going to be really rough for the first 2 weeks and he was 100% correct. The first 3 weeks were beyond miserable and there were days that I really do not remember much because the pain was so intense and unbearable. The surgeon told me that in the end my recovery would be much healthier on my body without any pain killers, which I now believe to be very true. After hearing so many terrifying stories about how addiction can begin, I am extremely grateful that I could not take anything. For me, this was truly a blessing in disguise and made all of my pain (and there was a tremendous amount) more than worth it.”  As with every medical condition, Lisa’s situation was her individual situation, and her pain management came under the care and supervision of an expert medical professional. Their decisions about her pain management were theirs together and should not be seen as direction for anyone else. At the same time, her situation and her doctor’s support illustrate that there are different ways pain can, and possibly should, be managed, especially in light of the increase in substance dependence that’s directly related to prescription painkillers.  Just something to think about. What are your thoughts on the role of prescription painkillers as it relates to substance abuse? We’d like to hear from you. And a very warm thank you to Lisa Buchwald for sharing her experience with TTDF  

Tiger Woods. Matthew Perry. Ant McPartlin.

What do these individuals, and far too many more, have in common? All developed an addiction to painkillers that were prescribed to them by medical professionals for valid reasons.

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       Guest Blog Posts: Mission Criteria   Do you have a story to tell or an insight to share? Would you like to be part of our Foundation’s effort to spread knowledge and awareness? If so –  if you would like to add to our blog and share your thoughts, perceptions and experiences – this is your mission, should you choose to accept it:  1.     Send an email to TTDFBlogEditor@gmail.com. You can either send us your pre-written content or, if you’d like to vet out your idea first, you can send us an idea of what you’d like to write.  2.     You agree that all content will support – or at minimum will not detract from – our message of awareness and acceptance.  3.     You agree that submitted content will never assign or imply blame on the part of individuals struggling with substance use, abuse and addiction.  4.     You agree to reinforcing the removal of – or at minimum not supporting – any element of the stigma that surrounds substance use, abuse and addiction. To that end, you agree to be transparent about who you are, just as everyone at TTDF is transparent about our stories, our struggles, our heartache and our hope.  5.     Any content of yours that we post will be subject to review and edit by the Blog Editor prior to posting. Edited content will be sent back to you for your approval prior to posting, and you will have the right to approve it or to withdraw your content prior to being published. The Tina Dailey Foundation will retain the right to maintain the content on the site as long as desired and to promote it via social media and other forums.  6.     Any content of yours that we publish will be attributed to you, the writer.  7.     You agree that any content you send to TTDF for posting will not have been published prior on any other site or print medium.  8.     You verify that any content submitted to TTDF is of your own creation and is not stolen or plagiarized.  9.     You agree to let us send you virtual hugs for being a vital and integral part of our mission to provide hope and to assist, as an agent of change, in improving the future for those who struggle with substance use, abuse and addiction, to educate, to remove the stigma, and to provide strength for family members and friends who support them.  We look forward to your submissions. “Alone we can do so little. Together, we can do so much.” ~ Helen Keller

Do you have a story to tell or an insight to share? Would you like to be part of our Foundation’s effort to spread knowledge and awareness? If so –  if you would like to add to our blog and share your thoughts, perceptions and experiences – this is your mission, should you choose to accept it:

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Aunt Tina and Addiction

Aunt Tina and Addiction

Hi everyone! It’s Zoe. I’m 9 years old. I’m the niece of Tina Dailey.
 
Tina died 2 ½ years ago. I remember that day like it was yesterday. My mom and dad were exercising, I was on the couch watching TV, and my brother was at his friend's house. It was just a normal day. And then my mom learned what happened to Tina, and she broke into tears. It was terrible.
 

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